Become a R.A.D® Club Member for the newest products, inspiration and exclusive launches.

BAG

IN DETAIL:
THE RAD ONE

Oct 12, 21

Words by BSG

IN DETAIL: <br> THE RAD ONE
IN DETAIL: <br> THE RAD ONE
IN DETAIL: <br> THE RAD ONE

IN DETAIL:
THE RAD ONE

Oct 12, 21

Words by BSG

TEST ARTICLE #2 March 22 is World Water Day, a day of observance established by the United Nations in 1993. This year’s theme is Valuing Water, which touches upon both water’s cultural importance and its status as a central human right.

March 22 is World Water Day, a day of observance established by the United Nations in 1993. This year’s theme is Valuing Water, which touches upon both water’s cultural importance and its status as a central human right. For some perspective on the UN’s 6th Sustainable Development Goal (SDG 6), which is to achieve clean water and sanitation for all by 2030, we spoke with Neil Dhot, the Executive Director of AquaFed, The International Federation of Private Water Operators, which advises the UN and promotes water issues worldwide. Could you give us an overview of how access to clean water relates to human rights?

The Human Right to Water and Sanitation acknowledges that these are essentials in every person’s life. It was recognised by the United Nations General Assembly in 2010, and means everyone, without discrimination, is entitiled to sufficient, safe, acceptable, physically accessible and affordable water for personal and domestic use. Currently, more than 2 billion people around the world do not have access to safe drinking.

It’s certainly the case that societies in the developed world take access to clean water for granted. 

However, privatization is not why more than 2 billion people around the world don’t have access to safe drinking water. Location, climate and geography are more salient factors in places like sub-Saharan Africa. Equally, mismanagement by public authorities, weak governance, and lack of regulation are also significant. They lead to a lack of confidence on the part of investors (both public and private) to invest in essential equipment and infrastructure to provide water. Water is heavy and cannot be transferred on a grid like electricity, so its composition is, in itself, a huge problem.

Privatization functions properly when companies work with governments to provide access to water and sanitation, and are subject to regulations. When a public authority retains control of the water supply, and sets the price and level of investment, privatization does not lead to limited access.

It’s certainly the case that societies in the developed world take access to clean water for granted. 

Can proper privatization lead to better water outcomes? And can it provide sustainable options for future generations? Private companies have the technical expertise to provide sustainable solutions for future generations such as water reuse, smart water grids, etc. But for these to be brought into public use, they need adequate funding from local, state, and federal governments. What are some progressive alternatives for getting clean water to those in need? And what isn’t working?

The ideas are there – they just need more investment and better cooperation. Water reuse technology is already being deployed across the world. Wastewater from homes and factories is capable, when treated, of being restored to such good quality people can drink it, and it can be used to refill aquifers. On the other hand, the construction industry still isn’t required to make the houses it builds greywater

 

Share: TWITTER COPY LINK